Remembering Charles Barsotti: Cartoonist and Dog Lover

New Yorker cartoonist Charles Barsotti, passes away at age 80, leaving behind a legacy of funny dogs.

On June 16, 2014, famed cartoonist Charles Barsotti passed away at the age of 80 due to brain cancer. His work was seen in many notable publications. He was the cartoon editor of The Saturday Evening Post. He was also a staff cartoonist at the The New Yorker, where approximately 1,400 of his cartoons appeared, up until the time of his death.

One of the key repeating characters in his cartoons was a nameless, lovable dog. In 1992, office supplies company Niceday Ltd adopted the dog character as their logo and was nicknamed “Niceday pup.” In 1996, the dog appeared on postage stamps in the United Kingdom featuring Barsotti’s cartoons.

His artwork was very recognizable: most of his drawings conveyed complicated ideas through just a few simple lines. Barsotti published six books in his lifetime, all collections of his cartoons, most notably: They Moved My Bowl: Dog Cartoons.

Charles Barsotti

Barsotti told jokes in short sentences with simple drawings, but he told them well. His characters and premises seemed absurd, but at the same time, made a lot of sense. One cartoon features a panicked human lying on a psychiatric couch while a dog sits in an armchair speaking the soothing words that we all know we our dogs are saying to us during our darkest times: “Well, I think you’re wonderful.”

Basrsotti has so many wonderful cartoons about dogs to share, we’ve chosen 5 of our favorites:

Charles Barsotti

 

Charles Barsotti dog cartoon

 

Charles Barsotti dog cartoon
 
Charles Barsotti dog cartoon

 

Charles Barsotti dog cartoon

 

Charles Barsotti dog cartoon

 

We know there are dogs in heaven awaiting your arrival, but you will be greatly missed.

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