Iditarod Sees Musher Win Third Year In A Row

Dallas Seavey and his fast pack of dogs have won the 2016 dog sled race in Alaska.

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Dallas Seavey with members of his dog team after his third consecutive Iditarod win Via Alaska Dispatch News/YouTube
Anastasia Thrift

An Iditarod racer can add another record to his list.

Dallas Seavey and his team of dogs finished the 44th Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race at 2:20 a.m. in Nome, Alaska, winning the race for the third time in a row and fourth time in five years, according to Reuters. He had covered 1,049 miles from Anchorage to Nome in eight days, 11 hours, 20 minutes and 16 seconds, beating his own record.

Dallas Seavey crossed the Iditarod finish line at 2 a.m. in high spirits. Via Alaska Dispatch News/YouTube

Dallas Seavey crossed the Iditarod finish line at 2 a.m. in high spirits. Via Alaska Dispatch News/YouTube

Close on his heels came his father, Mitch Seavey, who crossed the finish line right after his son. Each held first place at different times throughout the race until Dallas got a roughly 40-minute lead upon reaching White Mountain, about 77 miles from the finish line, where racers are required to rest for eight hours before continuing.

Mitch Seavey is the oldest musher to have won the Iditarod and almost placed first in this year's race. Via Artistic Puppy Creative/Facebook

Mitch Seavey is the oldest musher to have won the Iditarod and almost placed first in this year’s race. Via Artistic Puppy Creative/Facebook

In 2013, Mitch, now 56, became the oldest musher to win. Dallas became the youngest Iditarod winner ever at age 25 in 2012 with his first win. For this year’s race, he broke his own time record after overcoming some hurdles.

“It was a heck of a trip all the way from the start,” Dallas told Reuters. “It was ups and downs. It wasn’t as straightforward as last time. It came together with an awesome little team.”

Challenges included high winds and temperatures that hit 10 degrees below zero Fahrenheit on the last night, and a cold and congestion that affected Dallas for the first two-thirds of the race.

Tragedy also affected the race this year when a snowmobiler crashed into two dog sled teams on March 12, killing one dog and injuring four others. The inebriated snowmobile driver, Arnold Demoski, was arrested after turning himself in to police and faces several charges.

The Iditarod began in 1973 to honor a rescue mission that carried diphtheria serum by sled-dog relay to Nome in 1925. The current dog-sled race traverses a portion of that route and additional miles at all hours of the day.

For his win, Dallas will take home $75,000 and a new Dodge Ram truck.

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