Anna? Hummingbird

Commonly seen in open woodlands, shrubby areas, back yards and parks, Anna? Hummingbird is the most widespread hummingbird on North America? Pacific slope.

Excerpted from “Meet the Hummers?in “Popular Birding Series: Hummingbirds,?lt;/em> published by BirdChannel.com publisher, I-5 Publishing.

Anna? Hummingbird is the most widespread hummingbird on North America? Pacific slope. This adaptable bird species often lives in human habitats. During courtship, a male Anna? Hummingbird stakes out territory over a flower patch with a rich nectar supply. A female Anna? Hummingbird enters the male? territory, mates and then leaves to build a nest. Unlike similar hummingbirds, Anna? Hummingbird is not migratory.

Anna? Hummingbird Quick Fact
Genus and species: Calypte anna
Habitat: Anna? Hummingbird is common in open woodlands, shrubby areas, back yards and parks.
Flight field marks: This hummingbird? tail is held stationary and aligned with the body and has gray-edged tail feathers.
Sitting field marks: short, straight bill; long, sloping forehead; dark head with pale eye-ring. Male Anna? Hummingbirds have iridescent, rose-red crowns and throats; the females have gray breasts and a red patch in the center of their throats.
Voice: The call sounds squeaking and grating, and the feeding call is “chick.?lt;br /> Nesting: The female Anna? Hummingbird builds a nest using plant down and spider webs, camouflaged by lichens. She lays one to three pure-white eggs, then incubates and feeds the chicks.
Feeding: tiny insects, spiders and flower nectar from red-flowering currant and fuchsia.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Article Categories:
Birds · Lifestyle